Mobile home parks - water and wastewater

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Manufactured homes along a paved street in Grand Junction, Colorado
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All Coloradans deserve access to safe, clean drinking water and wastewater services including those living in mobile home parks. The department makes sure that all public water systems follow the law. We oversee mobile home parks that are public water systems and/or provide wastewater treatment. 

We also coordinate with the Department of Local Affairs which runs the Mobile Home Park Oversight Program. They make sure that mobile home park owners, landlords, and tenants are following the Mobile Home Park Act. Mobile homes are an effective way to provide affordable housing and the Mobile Home Park Act ensures that mobile home park owners and tenants are protected from eviction on short notice, protecting the owners from losing their homes. People can contact the Department of Local Affairs to:

  • Register a mobile home park.
  • Submit new complaints.
  • Review resolved complaints.

Water and mobile home parks

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Frequently asked questions

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Where do mobile home parks get their water?
 
Where do mobile home parks get their water?

Mobile home parks get water from either:

  • A water utility; or
  • Its own source of water, like a well.

Most parks get water from a utility. We recommend asking your park manager who provides your water. Every year you should receive a consumer confidence report describing the quality of your drinking water. You should ask the park manager for a copy if you are not receiving the report or you can request a copy from the water utility.
 

Who is responsible for the drinking water quality? 

Federal regulations define what is a public drinking water system. This applies to many entities like apartment complexes, businesses, and mobile home parks that meet the definition of a drinking water system.

CDPHE regulates mobile home parks that: 

  • Provide drinking water to at least 25 people per day for at least 60 days per year, or at least 15 service connections (trailers, buildings, etc.), AND: 
    • Have their own source of drinking water (well or surface water source); or
    • Purchase water from another utility and bill the residents specifically for water (e.g. their water bill fluctuates every billing cycle); or 
    • Receive water from another utility and provide additional onsite treatment.

CDPHE does NOT regulate mobile home parks (or other entities) if:

  • They receive water from another utility and do not bill the residents for water based on individual water use (e.g. included in rent, lease, or flat-rate utility billing).
  • They do not serve water to at least 25 people per day for at least 60 days per year or at least 15 service connections.

Most mobile home parks are not registered public water systems and instead get water from the local water utility. In this case, the utility is in charge of the water up to the water meter that is for the entire park. The park is responsible for repairing and maintaining the pipes that deliver water to mobile homes past that point.

 

NOTE: Homeowners are generally responsible for the home's water service line, and the pipes, plumbing, and fixtures within the home. If you rent your home, review your lease to find out whether you or your landlord is responsible for addressing issues with pipes, plumbing, and/or water fixtures.

You can look up whether your mobile home park is a registered public drinking water system on the Drinking water system data webpage. Tips for how to search the website can be found in this guide to find online records.

If your mobile home park charges you for the amount of water used on a monthly basis but is not listed as a public water system, please contact Water Quality Control Division drinking water compliance at 303-692-3556.

 

More information

 

 

Does CDPHE regulate mobile home parks?
Does CDPHE regulate mobile home parks?

No. DOLA regulates mobile home parks. 

Sometimes mobile home parks are public water systems and might also provide their own wastewater treatment. These activities and utilities are regulated by CDPHE. 

The department also oversees the operators that treat the water. The park owner and water operator must meet the rules in Regulation 100.

You can look up whether your mobile home park is a registered public drinking water system on the Drinking water system data webpage.
 

CDPHE Regulations

 

More information

Who manages mobile home park sewage?
Who manages mobile home park sewage?

Mobile home parks either have to be connected to a local sewage utility or have their own sewage system. If the mobile home park treats over 2,000 gallons per day, then CDPHE oversees that sewage treatment system. If they treat less than 2,000 gallons per day, then the county oversees the sewage treatment system. 

Typically the park is responsible for repairing and maintaining the sewage pipes in the mobile home park and having an operator for the wastewater collection. If a park is treating the water, they also need an operator for the treatment system. Wastewater operator requirements are outlined in Regulation 100

Homeowners are responsible for the pipes within the home. If you rent your home, review your lease to find out whether you or your landlord is responsible for addressing issues with pipes and sewage. 


Tell park management if you see water leaking or sewage outside of your home.

If management does not quickly take care of the problem, you can report the problem to your local public health agency. You can also file a complaint with the Division of Housing’s Mobile Home Park Oversight Program. Complaints can be filed online or by calling 1-833-924-1147 (toll-free) and requesting a paper complaint form by mail.

If a sanitary sewer overflow is confirmed, please call the state's spill reporting line at 1-877-518-5608.

 

More information

Contact information

Mobile home park management is responsible for providing good service. They need to:

  • Have an emergency contact number and post it in common areas of the park.
  • Provide a different source of water and restrooms if there is no water for longer than 24 hours.
  • Make sure plumbing lines are repaired and in good working order.
  • Give 48 hours notice before planned maintenance that will shut off water for more than two hours.

CDPHE only has authority over some mobile home parks and their water.

Any other complaints about your mobile home park should go to the Department of Local Affairs.

 

Department of Local Affairs

Mobile Home Park Oversight Program

MHPOP@state.co.us

1-833-924-1147 (toll free)

Department of Public Health and Environment

Water Quality Control Division

cdphe.commentswqcd@state.co.us

303-692-3500 


 
    Funding assistance for mobile home parks

    Your mobile home park may be eligible for financial help for water-related projects.

     

     

     

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    Resources

    Mobile Home Park Oversight Program Resources (DOLA)

    DOLA's website includes the following: laws and policies, notice of homeowner rights, fact sheets, registration and complaint database, number of lots and homes by registered parks, mobile home park sale requirements, list of parks for sale, answers to frequently asked questions, and additional resources.

    Find your local public health agency by county

    Each county may have a mobile home park program to provide resources. You can also check your city of residence.