Environmental Justice

What is environmental justice?

Environmental justice recognizes that all people have a right to breathe clean air, drink clean water, participate freely in decisions that affect their environment, live free of dangerous levels of toxic pollution, experience equal protection of environmental policies, and share the benefits of a prosperous and vibrant pollution-free economy.

~ Colorado Environmental Justice Act

 

Environmental justice is the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income, with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies.  This goal will be achieved when everyone enjoys:

  • The same degree of protection from environmental health hazards, and
  • Equal access to the decision-making process to have a healthy environment in which to live, learn, and work.

~ United States Environmental Protective Agency

Learning about environmental justice

What are Disproportionately Impacted Communities?

Some communities in Colorado have more than their fair share of environmental exposures. As a result, they may experience higher levels of environmental health harm. Many of these communities are home to people of color and low-income families.

The Environmental Justice Act (House Bill 21-1266) refers to these places as Disproportionately Impacted Communities. It defines Disproportionately Impacted Communities as:

  • Census Block Groups with one of 3 demographic factors:
    • More than 40% low-income households;
    • More than 40% people of color households;
    • More than 40% housing cost-burdened households;
  • Communities with a history of environmental racism perpetuated through exclusionary laws, including redlining, anti-Hispanic, anti-Black, anti-indigenous, and anti-immigrant laws; and
  • Communities where multiple factors (socioeconomic stressors, disproportionate environmental burdens, lack of public participation) cumulatively contribute to persistent public health and environmental disparities.

The Environmental Justice Unit is identifying communities that meet this definition. For more information, visit our mapping tab, below. 

What is the Environmental Justice Act?

On July 2, 2021, Governor Polis signed the Environmental Justice Act (HB21-1266) into law. The Environmental Justice Act commits to strengthening environmental justice. It prioritizes reducing environmental health disparities in disproportionately impacted communities.

What is the Air Toxics Act?

On June 24, 2021, Governor Polis signed the Air Toxics Act (House Bill 21-1189) into law. The Air Toxics Act enhances air monitoring and protects the health of communities near facilities that emit higher levels of hazardous air pollutants. It requires meaningful public input on fenceline monitoring plans that will provide real-time monitoring of air pollutants.

What are other Colorado state agencies doing to strengthen Environmental Justice?

Many state agencies besides CDPHE are working to strengthen environmental justice:

In addition to the Environmental Justice Act (HB21-1266) there are many other laws that advance environmental justice in Colorado:

EPA resources for learning about environmental justice

 

What we are up to

Air Pollution Control 

The Air Pollution Control Division has a Climate Change Unit. The Unit works to protect a livable climate by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Climate Change Unit focuses on communities disproportionately impacted by climate change. 

Climate change will impact people who are already dealing with multiple stressors the most. Effective climate action will reduce harm to all Coloradans, including disproportionately impacted communities. At the same time, climate mitigation strategies could either worsen disparities or promote equity. We commit to using the fight to mitigate climate change as an opportunity to support racial equity and economic justice.

To achieve these goals, we have developed a Climate Equity Framework. The framework ensures that racial equity and economic justice guide our response to climate change. The Climate Change Unit worked with community organizations, community members, and environmental justice experts in state, federal, and local government to develop the framework.

The final Climate Equity Framework:

  • Provides principles to ensure that Colorado’s response to climate change considers equity at every stage,
  • Shares best practices for outreach and engagement with disproportionately impacted communities,
  • Outlines a plan for stakeholder engagement in greenhouse gas emission reduction rulemakings, and
  • Provides questions to help consider potential equity impacts of implementing rules.  

The Climate Change Unit has also developed a Climate Equity Data Viewer. It will help prioritize engagement efforts and evaluate the potential impacts of climate-related policy decisions. The Climate Equity Data Viewer uses population and environmental factors to calculate a climate equity score. Areas with a higher climate equity score have more potential impacts from climate change than other communities. There are scores for each census block group in Colorado.

Hazardous Materials and Waste Management

The Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division provides financial assistance and free test kits to low-income families to mitigate radon.

  • The purpose of the Low-Income Radon Mitigation Assistance Program is to enhance a safe living environment for low-income homeowners in Colorado. 
  • Radon is an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally in Colorado. If there is too much radon in your home, it can pose risks to your health. 
  • The Environmental Protection Agency recommends that radon stay below a level called an “action level.” That level is 4 picocuries per liter. A picocurie is a measure of radiation exposure.
  • If a Colorado homeowner has radon levels above the action level, they may be eligible for assistance. The Program can pay to install a radon mitigation system. 
  • In 2021, the Program provided about 7,000 free radon test kits. The Program has mitigated 229 homes since it started in February 2018. It will continue to work towards providing a safe and healthy living space for all Coloradans, no matter their financial status. 
Water Quality Control

Data shows that people in Colorado who speak languages other than English are more likely to drink bottled water than tap water. To address this disparity, the Water Quality Control Division launched an outreach program about the benefits of tap water for Colorado’s immigrant and refugee communities.

Outreach to refugee and immigrant communities is part of CDPHE’s 2016-2017 strategic plan. That document set goals to advance environmental justice and health equity. 

Data shows that Morgan County is home to large populations of foreign-born residents. Many of them report drinking bottled water. Because of this data, we focus our outreach efforts in Morgan County. 

Most drinking water systems in Morgan County comply with regulations. But one system does not always provide safe drinking water. Because of this, our outreach does not just encourage people to drink tap water. It also teaches people how to read a consumer confidence report. Every community water system must create and distribute a consumer confidence report every year. This report provides information about water quality and any health risks that customers should know about. While the report contains important information, it is not easy to read. 

We taught classes for local health navigators to help refugee and immigrant communities better understand their tap water quality. We’ve also distributed information at mobile food pantries and at a local health festival. We placed educational posters in our partner locations. We even worked with a student group to paint a mural showing the benefits of tap water. 

In the future, we will work with refugee resettlement agencies to provide tap water information during the orientation process. We will also work with local health clinics to display posters in their facilities. 

Please contact Kaitlyn Beekman at Kaitlyn.beekman@state.co.us for more information! 

Recent environmental justice events
October 27, November 6, November 17, and December 4: Community Conversations about Air Quality

The Environmental Justice Act creates more opportunities for disproportionately impacted community members to get involved in decisions about air quality.
CDPHE recently hosted special outreach sessions for disproportionately impacted communities.

These sessions were about three air quality rulemakings:

  • Updating and clarifying standards for lead-based paint abatement. 
  • Protecting the air and views in our national parks and wilderness areas by reducing pollution that decreases visibility. 
  • Reduce air and climate pollution from the oil and gas sector.

During each community conversation, staff from the Air Pollution Control Division provided information and answered questions.

Review meeting materials: fact sheets about each rulemaking in English and Spanish and other meeting materials.

November 12, 2021: Commerce City Drinking Water Forum
Diverse group of people taste test multiple glasses of water

Cultivando is an organization that serves the Latinx community in Adams County. It focuses on community leadership to advance health equity through advocacy, collaboration, and policy change. 

Cultivando invited CDPHE to join the community in tasting the water in Commerce City. Community members were worried that their water was unsafe to drink because of its taste.   

What we did at the event:

  • CDPHE and South Adams County Water & Sanitation District joined community members to taste water samples from around Commerce City.
  • We discussed the causes of taste and odor in drinking water, and why that is different than chemicals that pose health risks.
  • We also discussed low-cost options to improve the taste of tap water. Drinking tap water provides many benefits. For example, fluoride in tap water is important to keep teeth healthy. There are ways to improve the taste of tap water that do not require spending money on expensive options like buying bottled water or installing whole-house filtration systems.
  • CDPHE and South Adams County Water staff answered questions from the community. 

You can learn more by reading the Taste and Odor Frequently Asked Questions document in English or Spanish.

You can also learn more by reading about the benefits of tap water in English, Spanish, or Somali

October 29, 2021: Elyria-Swansea Walking Tour

Elyria, Globeville, Swansea & Partners invited the department on a walking tour of the Elyria and Swansea neighborhoods.

Why did we go on the tour?

  • We accepted the community’s invitation to tour Elyria & Swansea because we’re committed to environmental justice. 
  • We know that listening and spending time in communities is the best way to understand the experiences of their residents.
  • CDPHE leaders went on the tour because many different programs within CDPHE work with residents of Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea. 
  • North Denver’s Globeville, Elyria, and Swansea neighborhoods are predominantly low-income and Latinx. They bear a disproportionate impact of environmental health risks compared to other communities in Colorado. 
  • We are working hard on reducing these environmental health disparities in north Denver and across Colorado.
  • We want to ensure that community voices are represented in our processes to make decisions about environmental matters.
September 28, 2021: Air Toxics Community Meeting

The department co-hosted a meeting with community leaders about air toxics. The purpose of the meeting was to provide information about how to get involved with implementing a new law: the Air Toxics Act (HB21-1189). The Air Toxics Act requires some companies to submit fenceline monitoring plans for public review and comment.

  • Community leaders gave an overview of the law and provided their perspectives. CDPHE staff described how to get involved with the fenceline monitoring plans. We also discussed fenceline monitoring technologies, and responded to questions from the public.
  • Review meeting materials: You can watch a video of the event, see survey results, and read fact sheets about the Air Toxics Act in English and Spanish.
  • Air Toxics Act Fact Sheet
  • Air Toxics Act Fact Sheet (Espanol)

Meetings and engagement

Open Embed

Upcoming events

Suncor’s Proposed Draft Water Quality Permit

CDPHE is asking the public to weigh in on a permit that will limit pollution and place more conditions on the Suncor oil refinery. The draft permit is a more restrictive permit than Suncor had before. It will further protect Sand Creek and downstream waters for recreation, fish, agriculture, and drinking. The permit will also increase transparency about Suncor’s site operations. Finally, it will require monitoring and limits for dozens of toxic metals and chemicals, like benzene and PFAS.

You can access the full draft permit information materials and provide your comments on the Suncor Water Quality Permits webpage.

There are two ways to submit written feedback on the permit:

Members of the public may provide written feedback until Thursday, Feb. 17, 2022

The Water Quality Control Division will also host virtual public comment meetings. You can provide verbal comments by signing up for the meetings below:

You must sign up for public comment if you want to give oral comments during the meeting you attend using this form. Each speaker will have three minutes to provide oral comments. We encourage written comments if oral comments may take longer than three minutes. 

Environmental Justice Action Task Force 

The Environmental Justice Action Task Force is a new body created by the Environmental Justice Act (House Bill 21-1266). You can learn more about the task force on the tab below.

The Environmental Justice Action Task Force will hold its second, virtual meeting on February 22. Simultaneous Spanish interpretation will be available.  

Register here for the task force meeting and to provide public comment. The Task Force is soliciting comments about the topics it must address in its Final Report, which are defined by the Environmental Justice Act and listed in its Scope of Work.

The Environmental Justice Action Task Force has four subcommittees that will work to address specific topics. All subcommittee meetings are open to the public. You can join the meetings at the following dates and times using the links below:

 

Environmental Justice Advisory Board

The Environmental Justice Advisory Board will hold its first, virtual meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 5, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Simultaneous Spanish interpretation will be available.

Register for Advisory Board meeting here

The Environmental Justice Advisory Board is a new body created by the Environmental Justice Act (House Bill 21-1266). You can learn more about the Advisory Board on the tab below. 

Future events - notification 

If you want to stay up to date about environmental justice events and other important updates, use our online sign-up to receive email notifications

Environmental Justice Act

On July 2, 2021, Governor Polis signed the Environmental Justice Act (HB21-1266) into law. The Environmental Justice Act commits to strengthening environmental justice. It prioritizes reducing environmental health disparities in disproportionately impacted communities.

The Environmental Justice Act creates the following roles:

  • Environmental Justice Advisory Board
  • Environmental Justice Action Task Force
  • Environmental Justice Ombudsperson

Read more about these groups and roles on the tabs above.

Environmental Justice Advisory Board


The Environmental Justice Advisory Board is a volunteer board. The Governor and Executive Director of CDPHE appoint its 12 members.

The Board serves Colorado by:

  • Coordinating with the Environmental Justice Ombudsperson.
  • Advising CDPHE on best practices for engaging disproportionately impacted communities.
  • Responding to environmental justice policy matters referred by the Governor’s Office or CDPHE.
  • Creating and overseeing an environmental justice grants program.
 
Members of the Environmental Justice Advisory Board
  • Aaron Martinez, Pueblo, current or former resident of a disproportionately impacted community.
  • Philip Lopez, Commerce City, current or former resident of a disproportionately impacted community.
  • Steven Arauza, Rifle, current or former resident of a disproportionately impacted community.
  • Christina Yebuah, Aurora, current or former resident of a disproportionately impacted community.
  • Bianka Emerson, Lakewood, representative of a nongovernmental organization that represents statewide interests to advance racial justice.
  • Jason Swann, Denver, representative of a nongovernmental organization that represents statewide interests to advance environmental justice.
  • Josette Jaramillo, Pueblo, representative of worker interests in disproportionately impacted communities
  • Dr. David Rojas Rueda, Fort Collins, CDPHE Executive Director appointee
  • Jorge Figueroa, Lafayette, CDPHE Executive Director appointee
  • Jonathan Skinner-Thompson, Boulder, CDPHE Executive Director appointee
  • Rupal Shah, Lakewood, CDPHE Executive Director appointee

Submit a comment to the Environmental Justice Advisory Board
Please email your comments to cdphe_ej@state.co.us with “EJAB” in the subject line

 
Next Meeting of the Environmental Justice Advisory Board

The Environmental Justice Advisory Board will hold its first, virtual meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 5, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Simultaneous Spanish interpretation will be available.

Register for Advisory Board meeting here

Environmental justice grants portal [coming soon]

  • About the Environmental Justice Grant Program
  • Apply for an Environmental Justice Grant
  • Meet the Past Recipients of Environmental Justice Grants
  • Read our Annual Reports (coming in 2023)
  • Conflict of Interest Policy and Bylaws

 

Environmental Justice Action Task Force

The Environmental Justice Action Task Force has 27 members from across Colorado. By Nov. 14, 2022, it must create a comprehensive state government Environmental Justice Plan.

The plan must address many different topics, including:

  • Incorporating equity analyses into state agency environmental decisions.
  • Identifying cumulative impacts of state actions in disproportionately impacted communities.
  • Requiring permits in disproportionately impacted communities to avoid, minimize & mitigate impacts.
  • Setting measurable goals to reduce environmental health disparities.
  • Creating a plan to address data gaps
  • Recommending best practices for community engagement in disproportionately impacted communities
  • Suggesting revisions to the definition of disproportionately impacted community.
  • Recommending which agencies should conduct enhanced outreach in disproportionately impacted communities.
 
Members of the Environmental Justice Action Task Force

Appointed by Governor Polis:

  • Robyn Wille, CDPHE representative with expertise in Air Quality
  • Trisha Oeth, CDPHE representative with expertise in Water Quality
  • Dr. Sheila Davis, CDPHE representative with expertise in Health Equity
  • Megan Holcomb, Department of Natural Resources (“DNR”) representative
  • Marsha Nelson, Colorado Department of Transportation (“CDOT”) representative
  • Dominique Gómez, Colorado Energy Office (“CEO”) representative
  • Doug Dean, Public Utilities Commission (“PUC”) representative
  • Jordan Beezley, Department of Agriculture (“DOA”) representative
  • Jonathan Asher, Governor’s Office representative

Appointed by the General Assembly:

  • Hilda Nucete, representative of disproportionately impacted communities (Congressional District 7), appointed by Speaker of the House Alec Garnett
  • Mara Brosy-Wiwchar, representative of the renewable energy industry, appointed by Speaker of the House Alec Garnett
  • Ean Tafoya, representative of an organization that carries out initiatives related to environmental justice, appointed by Speaker of the House Alec Garnett
  • Renée Millard-Chacon, representative of an organization that carries out initiatives related to environmental justice, appointed by Speaker of the House Alec Garnett
  • TBD, representative of local government in disproportionately impacted communities, appointed by House Minority Leader Hugh McKean
  • Kimberly Mendoza-Cooke, representative of disproportionately impacted communities (Congressional District 7), appointed by House Minority Leader Hugh McKean
  • Michael Sapp, representative of interests of people of color, appointed by House Minority Leader Hugh McKean
  • Tyson Johnston, representative of the nonrenewable energy industry, appointed by House Minority Leader Hugh McKean
  • Beatriz Soto, representative of disproportionately impacted communities (Congressional District 3), appointed by Senate President Leroy Garcia
  • Meera Fickling, representative of an organization that carries out initiatives related to environmental justice, appointed by Senate President Leroy Garcia
  • Gary Arnold, representative of an organization that represents worker interests in disproportionately impacted communities, appointed by Senate President Leroy Garcia
  • Jamie Valdez, representative of the interests of people of color, appointed by Senate President Leroy Garcia
  • Kamilah Beasley, representative of the interests of people of color, appointed by Senate Minority Leader Chris Holbert
  • Dr. Uni Blake, representative that works to support public health and is an environmental toxicologist, appointed by Senate Minority Leader Chris Holbert
  • Brent Nation, representative of disproportionately impacted communities (Congressional District 4), appointed by Senate Minority Leader Chris Holbert
  • Arthur Ortegon, representative of the interests of people of color, appointed by Senate Minority Leader Chris Holbert

Appointed by Tribal Governments

  • [TBD]
  • [TBD]
 
Submit a comment to the Environmental Justice Action Task Force

Please email your comments to cdphe_ej@state.co.us with “EJATF” in the subject line

 
Attend the Next Meeting of the Environmental Justice Action Task Force

The Environmental Justice Action Task Force will hold its second, virtual meeting on February 22. Simultaneous Spanish interpretation will be available.  

Register here for the task force meeting and to provide public comment. The Task Force is soliciting comments about the topics it must address in its Final Report, which are defined by the Environmental Justice Act and listed in its Scope of Work.

The Environmental Justice Action Task Force has four subcommittees that will work to address specific topics. All subcommittee meetings are open to the public. You can join the meetings at the following dates and times using the links below:

Meeting materials

Environmental Justice Ombudsperson

The Environmental Justice Ombudsperson is a new role within CDPHE. It was created by the Environmental Justice Act (House Bill 21-1266).

The Ombudsperson is appointed by the Governor. They report directly to CDPHE Executive Director Jill Hunsaker Ryan. The Ombudsperson receives administrative support from the Environmental Justice Unit, but is otherwise independent.

The Ombudsperson’s duties include:

  • Collaborating with the Environmental Justice Advisory Board to promote environmental justice.
  • Providing multiple means for residents of disproportionately impacted communities to contact the ombudsperson about environmental-related matters.
  • Working to improve the relationship between CDPHE and residents of disproportionately impacted communities through open, honest, frequent, and straightforward communication.
  • Earning the trust of disproportionately impacted community residents by responding directly to community questions that pertain to environmental justice matters.
  • Increasing the two-way flow of information between CDPHE and disproportionately impacted communities on environmental subjects.
  • Disseminating information through local schools, social media, local activity clubs, libraries, and other local services.
  • Prioritizing in-person meetings in communities with populations that are predominantly Black, Indigenous, Latino, or Asian-American, communities where median income is below the state’s average, and in rural locations.
  • Identifying ways to enable meaningful participation by disproportionately impacted communities in CDPHE decision-making processes.
  • Developing and implementing a process to receive complaints and inquiries for matters pertaining to environmental justice by maintaining a phone number, website, email address, and mailing address.
  • Establishing procedures to address complaints pertaining to environmental justice to the extent practicable.
  • Coordinating with the Office of Health Equity.
  • Working with CDPHE leadership to report to the Air Quality Control Commission on equitable progress towards Colorado’s greenhouse gas emission reduction goals.
  • Serving in an advisory capacity for other state agencies on engagement with disproportionately impacted communities in light of proposed agency actions.
  • Serving as an advocate for disproportionately impacted communities in CDPHE decision-making processes related to policies that implicate environmental justice.

Apply to serve as EJ Ombudsperson

The Governor will appoint the Ombudsperson. The Ombudsperson will report directly to the Executive Director of CDPHE but is otherwise independent. 
There is no deadline for applying, but interested candidates should apply soon. The Governor will appoint the Ombudsperson by February 2022.

Meet the Environmental Justice Ombudsperson [coming soon]

Environmental justice mapping

To advance environmental justice we need mapping tools that identify disproportionately impacted communities. We know that our mapping tools are only effective if community members are part of the process of creating them.
Our mapping tools help us direct funding and other resources to the communities that need them most. 

 

Colorado EnviroScreen

CDPHE is developing an environmental justice mapping tool called Colorado EnviroScreen.

 

Climate Equity Data Viewer

The Climate Change Unit has also developed a Climate Equity Data Viewer. It will help prioritize engagement efforts and evaluate the potential impacts of climate-related policy decisions.

The Climate Equity Data Viewer uses population and environmental factors to calculate a climate equity score. Areas with a higher climate equity score have more potential impacts from climate change than other communities. There are scores for each census block group in Colorado. You can learn more on the Climate Equity Data Viewer webpage.

 

Data Viewer of Disproportionately Impacted Communities

While Colorado EnviroScreen is under development, CDPHE has created an interim Data Viewer of Disproportionately Impacted Communities.
The map shows areas that meet the Environmental Justice Act definition of “Disproportionately Impacted Community.”

It shows census block groups where: more than 40% of households are:

  • Low-income
  • Housing cost-burdened, or
  • Include people of color. 

The Environmental Justice Act has other criteria for disproportionately impacted communities. We are identifying the areas that meet other parts of the definition through the Colorado Enviroscreen tool.
 

Environmental justice jobs

Current environmental justice positions open at CDPHE

About Us - Environmental Justice Unit

Environmental Justice Program Manager

Joel Minor (he/him)

Photo of smiling gentleman in front of a mountain

Joel joined CDPHE in June 2021. He most recently served in the Natural Resources and Environment Section of the Attorney General’s Office, where he represented the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission staff in the agency’s rulemakings to implement Senate Bill 19-181. Prior to the AG’s Office, Joel was a senior associate attorney at Earthjustice, where he represented north Denver community organizations in environmental justice matters and conservation and tribal community groups in litigation over federal oil and gas regulations and leasing decisions.

Before joining Earthjustice, Joel clerked for the Hon. Carlos F. Lucero of the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver. Joel earned his J.D. and M.S. in environmental science with a concentration in atmospheric science at Stanford, and a B.A. in Environmental Policy at Colorado College.

Joel is a 6th generation Coloradan who spends his spare time reading and writing fantasy and sci-fi, running, and playing board games.

 

 

Environmental Justice Air Quality Liaison

Nathalie Eddy (she/hers)

Smiling woman outdoor on a dirt trail

For over 20 years, Nathalie has focused much of her environmental and legal career on raising the voice of disproportionately impacted communities to strengthen environmental and public health outcomes and advocate for environmental justice. From Colorado youth-led dreams of adventure to international efforts to raise the ambition of the Paris Climate agreement,

Nathalie advocates for transparency, accountability, and community-driven change. In her recent role with Earthworks, Nathalie worked with communities impacted by oil and gas extraction across Colorado and New Mexico and conducted fieldwork to document oil and gas pollution. Prior to Earthworks, she was the Healthy Kids Director for Get Outdoors Leadville!, where she helped launch a community and youth-driven organization connecting kids to nature in Lake County.

Nathalie earned her J.D. focusing on international law and human rights from the George Washington University in Washington, D.C., her D.E.S.S. in environmental law from the Université Robert Schuman (Strasbourg, France), and her B.A. from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Nathalie grew up in the foothills of Littleton and now lives in Leadville with her family. She loves high mountain living and spends as much time as possible playing outside in the sun and snow chasing kids and donkeys. 


Environmental Justice Boards Manager

Lubna Ahmed (she/hers)

Smiling woman with long, dark hair standing in front of a wooden fence

Lubna Ahmed is passionate about working at the community level to build capacity and advance the sustainable well-being of under-resourced and disproportionately impacted populations. Lubna was born and raised in Ohio and holds a BA in Psychology from Miami University and a Master’s in Public Health from George Washington University.

After working at a variety of environmental conservation nonprofits in DC, Lubna served as an Environmental Educator with the Peace Corps in Nicaragua and returned to the states to work as the Director of Environmental Health at WE ACT for Environmental Justice in Harlem, NY. She most recently joined CDPHE’s Environmental Justice Unit after working as the Director of Water Program at Groundwork Denver.

Lubna loves all things food including cooking, baking, and of course eating. She enjoys hiking, dancing, drawing, gardening, watching and reading sci-fi, and playing the ukulele.

 

 
Environmental Justice Translation & Interpretation Specialist

Rosario Russi (she/hers)

Rosario studied law, linguistics, literature, and French translation and interpretation in her native country of Uruguay. She emigrated to the US as a young adult, where she has worked as a Spanish translator and interpreter for the past 30+ years

Throughout her career, Rosario has specialized in Education/Special Education, Health, and Marketing, and freelanced for many years, providing services in all stages of the translation process for publishing houses like Pearson/Scott Foresman, McDougal Littell, and Houghton Mifflin, a wide variety of agencies, and several Colorado organizations. Rosario served as an in-house translator and interpreter for Jeffco Public Schools, Denver Public Schools and, most recently, for Children’s Hospital Colorado. She has translated a variety of materials, including some weather-related apps and a series of award-winning educational materials about the climate for UCAR.

Rosario thoroughly enjoys being a language conduit and is very passionate about advocating for language equity and empowering second language learner communities. She loves traveling and learning how other people live, as much across the globe as across town. Hiking, yoga, indoor cycling are some of her favorite practices, as well as reading or watching good survival stories. Rosario is also a Certified Massage Therapist and Aerobics Instructor.

Contact Us

Email us: cdphe_ej@state.co.us
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