Emerging Infections Program (EIP)

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Colorado is one of ten sites in the Emerging Infections Program with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The program collects information on certain infections to learn more about disease patterns and risk factors. We use data from this program to make health recommendations and better understand infectious diseases in Colorado and the rest of the country. There are several different projects within the program.

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RESP-NET

RESP-NET is a national viral respiratory surveillance program that helps to provide more information about hospitalization associated with influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and COVID-19.  Colorado participates in RESP-NET, along with 13 other states.  Details about each individual program are provided below.

COVID-NET

COVID-19 hospital surveillance 
This project helps us learn more about COVID-19 such as how many people are getting hospitalized, risk factors for getting COVID-19 and being hospitalized, as well as how well the vaccine is working.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET)

About COVID-NET
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) population-based surveillance system that collects data from medical record review on COVID-19-associated adult and children's hospitalizations that have a positive test through a network of over 250 hospitals in fourteen states.

COVID-NET is CDC’s source for important data on hospitalization rates associated with COVID-19 as well as descriptive information about these hospitalizations including age, sex, race/ethnicity, and underlying health conditions. 

For more information on COVID-NET including publications, visit CDC’s COVID-NET website.
COVID-NET in Colorado
Colorado has participated in COVID-NET since March 2020. Data for Colorado are collected for the 5-county metro area (Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, Douglas, and Jefferson counties) which covers almost 50% of the Colorado population.

FluSurv-NET

The Influenza-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) is a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) population-based surveillance system that collects data on influenza-associated hospitalized cases through medical chart review. Colorado has participated in FluSurv-NET since 2004. Influenza-associated hospitalized case data is collected for adult and pediatric patients who are residents of the 5-county Denver metro area (Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties). 

FluSurv-NET provides descriptive data on patients hospitalized with influenza, including patient demographics, underlying medical conditions, viral respiratory testing and medical treatment. For more information on FluSurv-NET, please visit CDC’s FluSurv-NET website. 

RSV-NET

The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Hospitalization Surveillance Network (RSV-NET) is a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) population-based surveillance system that collects data on RSV-associated hospitalized cases through medical chart review. Colorado first began to participate in RSV-NET in 2018, beginning with two pilot hospitals in Denver. Since 2019, RSV-NET has expanded to include patients hospitalized for RSV that are residents of the 5-county Denver metro area (Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties).

RSV-NET provides descriptive data on patients hospitalized with RSV, including patient demographics, underlying medical conditions, viral respiratory testing and medical treatment.
For more information on RSV-NET, please visit CDC’s RSV-NET website.  

FoodNet

This project allows public health to learn more about diseases transmitted by food and water. These include E. coli O157:H7, Campylobacter, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, Vibrio, Cryptosporidium, and Cyclospora. Colorado has participated in FoodNet since 2001 and data are collected in a 7-county catchment (Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas, and Jefferson counties). Data is used to assess burden of foodborne illness in the United States, monitor trends in burden of specific diseases over time, attribute burden of illness to specific foods and settings, and disseminate information. FoodNet accomplishes its work through active surveillance; surveys of laboratories, physicians, and the general population; and population-based epidemiologic studies.

Special Projects
  • FoodNet Population Survey is a periodic survey of randomly selected residents in FoodNet surveillance area to estimate burden of acute diarrheal illness and to describe the frequency of specific food and other exposures linked to diarrheal illness
Active Bacterial Core Surveillance (ABCs)

This project helps us learn more about common bacterial infections that can cause serious diseases in some people including pertussis, legionellosis, invasive Haemophilus influenzae, invasive Neisseria meningitidis (or meningococcal disease) , invasive Group A Streptococcus (GAS), invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS), and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). This project also provides an infrastructure for further public health research, including special studies aimed at identifying risk factors for disease and learning more about the vaccines that help prevent these infections.

Special studies include:

  • Establishment of Group B Streptococcal immunologic endpoints reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit against invasive disease among young infants: a multi-state case-control study - This study is to help future development of a vaccine for pregnant women that will prevent their babies from getting group B strep. (ongoing)
  • 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine effectiveness evaluation among adults 65 years and older - A study to see how well the PCV13 vaccine is working to prevent people over 65 from getting invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). (completed)
  • Evaluation of Secondary Transmission of B. pertussis among Household Contacts Following 5-day Course of Azithromycin Post-exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) - This study was to learn if certain medicines are preventing people from spreading pertussis. (completed)

Additional information can be found here: https://www.cdc.gov/abcs/index.html

Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI) Surveillance 

This project gathers information to help us learn more about bacteria and other organisms linked to healthcare settings that can cause infections in some people. These include Clostridioides difficile (C. diff), candida (a type of yeast) in the bloodstream, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. Data collected helps answer critical questions about emerging HAI threats and antibiotic resistance in the United States and plays a key role in shaping future policies and recommendations targeting HAI prevention. 

Special Projects include:
  • HAI and Antibiotic Use Prevalence Surveys - This project examines the numbers and types of HAIs; the types of antimicrobial medications (such as antibiotics) and the reasons antimicrobial medications are used in hospitals and nursing homes. 
  • Addressing COVID-19 among Healthcare Personnel - This project measures the number and describes the characteristics of healthcare personnel (HCP) exposed to and infected with SARS-CoV-2 and describes potential risk or protective factors. 

Additional information can be found here: https://www.cdc.gov/hai/eip/index.html
View CDC’s HAICViz here: https://www.cdc.gov/hai/eip/haicviz.html