Press Release

CDPHE provides more extensive guidance on flushing water inside the property of returning residents and businesses

REMOTE (January 7, 2022) - The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) advises all Coloradans located in cities or towns impacted by the Marshall Fire to thoroughly flush all their water taps, including all faucets, shower, and bath spouts. Residents should flush with both hot and cold water. 

Polis Administration announces $1.8 million in funding for harm reduction organizations, local law enforcement agencies, and local governments to access naloxone for free

Denver, (January 5, 2022): Governor Jared Polis and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment announced $1.8 million has been allocated to the state’s Naloxone Bulk Purchase Fund. This money, made available through the American Rescue Plan Act, allows eligible entities such as harm reduction organizations, local law enforcement agencies, and local governments to access the funds needed to purchase naloxone at no cost to the agency. 

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment notifies of potential health risks associated with home fire debris

Remote, Jan 3: After the devastating fires this past week, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment recognizes that people are eager to return to their homes to see what can be recovered. Remember to stay out of the area until Boulder officials allow re-entry for your neighborhood. Please wait to be notified by your local city or county for guidance about entering your property. When you are permitted to re-enter, you should be aware of the immediate and long-term health risks associated with exposure to home fire ash and debris. 

Air Quality Control Commission approves state health department proposal to continue reducing regional haze and improving visibility in Colorado’s national parks

REMOTE (Dec. 20): The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission has given final approval to a set of proposals from the Department of Public Health and Environment that would further reduce pollution and subsequent haze at Colorado’s treasured national parks. The state has already achieved tens of thousands of tons of emissions reductions, staying ahead of its scheduled plan.