Shattuck (Denver Radium Site) restoration

Background

In 2001, the United States, the State of Colorado and the S.W. Shattuck Chemical Company settled the natural resource damage claim resulting from the release of hazardous substances from the Denver Radium Superfund Site, in southwest Denver, northeast of the intersection of Evans Avenue and Santa Fe Drive. 

The State of Colorado received $1,250,000 to be used towards the replacement, acquisition or restoration of natural resources. The Department of Interior also received $250,000. 

Restoration

The Colorado Natural Resources Trustees awarded the Greenway Foundation $1.7 million to complete habitat restoration along a 1.5 mile stretch of the South Platte River. 

In partnership with the City and County of Denver, the Colorado Water Conservation Board, Great Outdoors Colorado, US Fish and Wildlife, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife, the Greenway Foundation improved the area by: 

  • Removing non-native and invasive vegetation species and replacing them with native vegetation. 
  • Creating a more natural/riparian environment by realigning the River embankment.
  • Building emergent benches and drop structures to reconnect the river to a floodplain and restore a more natural connection between surface and groundwater while enhancing wildlife habitat.

Grant Frontier project where a drop structure improved the South Platte River by promoting fish movement and developing foraging and spawning areas.

Grant Frontier

Photo on the left shows the Grant Frontier project where a drop structure improved the South Platte River by promoting fish movement and developing foraging and spawning areas.

Improvements at Pasquinel’s Landing reconnected the South Platte River to the floodplain, restored the natural connection between surface and groundwater, and improved riparian and avian habitat.
Photo above shows Pasquinel’s Landing area along the South Platte River.

Pasquinel’s Landing

Improvements at Pasquinel’s Landing reconnected the South Platte River to the floodplain, restored the natural connection between surface and groundwater, and improved riparian and avian habitat.

The South Platte River near Overland Park where riffles and pools were created to provide aquatic habitat.

Overland Park

Photo on the left shows the South Platte River near Overland Park where riffles and pools were created to provide aquatic habitat.

A riverbank cleared of noxious and invasive vegetation and seeded and planted with native vegetation.

South Platte River Restoration Project

Photo to the left shows a riverbank cleared of noxious and invasive vegetation and seeded and planted with native vegetation. 

The Natural Resource Trustees awarded an additional $57,400 to the Greenway Foundation in 2019 to restore portions of the South Platte River between West Evans Avenue and West Florida Avenue.

Contact

Susan Newton
Federal Facilities Rocky Mountain Arsenal Team Leader 
susan.newton@state.co.us
303-692-3321